18050053

The Moon Sisters

By Therese Walsh

Released March 4th, 2014 by Crown

Length: 336 Pages

Genre: Literature/ Fiction-Magical Realism

Rating: Two Stars

Acquired: Via publisher

 

Younger sister Olivia “Livya” Moon set upon a journey to see the Cranberry Glades and the will ‘o wisps their now deceased mother often talked about and based a story upon. Reluctantly, her older sister Jazz comes along with two train hoppers that make for a less than delightful, but slightly moving story about family bonding and getting to where you’re meant to be.

Olivia Moon is a free spirited eighteen year old with Synesthesia who was the last one to be with their mother before her probable suicide. Jazz Moon is less free spirited, more fickle and abrasive than her sister. Constantly looking out for her, she has never been the loving or touchy feely type. So, when Olivia decides to take a trip to see the Glades where their mother’s only novel, left unfinished, was set, Jazz is more than reluctant. Outspoken throughout the whole trip, meet a train hopper nicknamed Hobbs and Red Grass, someone much more sketchy with a secret of his own. Both the sisters are holding on to something; while Hobbs is hiding all on is own. Trusting no one was a trend in the journey.

I had high hopes for this novel. The cover, for one, is beautiful. The title is pretty and alluring. I just couldn’t get into it. I finished it, albeit reluctantly. I dragged my feet the whole way, like Jazz. I didn’t connect to any of the characters. Jazz complained too much for a character that was cold, distant, and rightfully so was called a b*tch by Hobbs. Olivia was too free spirited for me. I’m all for flower children. But, there comes a point when you have to act like an adult. There were moments, but so fleeting. Walsh over did it for me with Olivia’s character. She was too much to handle. Hobbs was the only character I truly liked.

The plot was slow moving for me. I was confused a little by the end, but if I say why it’d be a total spoiler. I just thought there would be more magical realism like in Alice Hoffman and Sarah Addison Allen novels. I didn’t find much of it; of anything. There were letters to the father that disowned the mother that I personally felt were unnecessary and did not move the plot along at all. I think it was used as a way to understand the mother while having her dead, but I found myself skimming them rather than devouring them.

I wish I could say something extremely positive about this book. I did finish it, which I almost gave up on. But I don’t feel the same contentment I usually do after reading a novel I like. I won’t say don’t read this; maybe it just wasn’t for me. Just go at it with caution, perhaps. It got outstanding reviews on goodreads. I’m disappointed I cannot give same.

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